WomensHistoryReads interview: Joanna Kafarowski

As many of you know, my #WomensHistoryReads interview project started as a celebration of Women's History Month in March. But I found so many inspiring woman writers who find their subjects in inspiring women from history that I continued daily interviews through nearly all of April, and I'm not even done. So you can continue to look forward to occasional new installments in May. Hooray!

Next up: biographer Joanna Kafarowski on her recent book about Louise Arner Boyd, a truly extraordinary Arctic explorer.

 Joanna Kafarowski

Joanna Kafarowski

Greer: What do you find most challenging or most exciting about writing about historical women?

Joanna: I am really attracted to reading, researching and writing about historical women whose accomplishments and lives have been forgotten. It gives me a real charge to root around in dusty archives which have lain untouched for many years. There’s an additional responsibility when you are the first to write the first full biography of a person as happened with my book about Arctic explorer Louise Arner Boyd. Because you are the first one, you have to get it right. It makes it harder as well since you want to keep going with the research - you just know there is more pertinent information out there but you have to draw the line. So what is most exciting about writing about historical women makes it challenging as well! Louise Arner Boyd is such a fascinating woman and there is still so much to learn about her.

Greer:How would you describe what you write?

Joanna: So far I’ve written a biography and edited another book about environmental issues. An obvious common element is that both books are situated primarily in the North because this is a landscape that sings to me. Something about the harsh wilderness, the lack of artifice, the finality of life there is really appealing. And my works are women-inspired because these are the stories that I find most interesting myself. Realistically, I’m in my mid-fifties so only have a few books left in me to write. My biography of Louise Arner Boyd took me over ten years to research and write and while I don’t anticipate taking this long with future books, I want to spend my time- and my words- wisely. My intention is to write books that are meaningful, that present thought-provoking information about people or issues that, in my opinion, are not given enough coverage in our society, and to do the very best job I can as a person and writer of integrity to produce books that are solidly researched and well-written.

Greer: What book, movie or TV show would your readers be surprised to hear that you love?

Joanna: As a biographer, I read a lot about the extraordinary lives of other people and, of course I’m drawn to polar history and anything affecting the circumpolar north. I tend to steer clear of fluffy stuff and love discovering small gems that are often disguised as something else. The Man Who Was Magic by Paul Gallico and Momo by Michael Ende are often considered children’s books but I learn something new every time I read them. They are both sadly overlooked but their simplicity and powerful message really resonates with me. But I do love children’s literature as well and return over and over to many titles I first read many years ago.

I am often asked this question and am interested in your response. How does being a woman inform your research and writing about historical women?

Greer: Great question! I suppose one answer is that it doesn't -- great stories are great stories, and they are gifts no matter where we unearth them and who does the unearthing. But I do think that as a woman, specifically a feminist, I'm deeply interested in discovering the stories of the women who came before us and laid the groundwork for where we are now. It's important to think about how far we've come -- and how far we have yet to go. Acknowledging and spreading the stories of extraordinary women from the past helps us acknowledge the extraordinary potential we each have within us. Knowing what they did, who knows what we might do?

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For more information, Joanna Kafarowski can be reached through social media:

 

Website: www.joannakafarowski.com  

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joannakafarowski/ 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joannakafarowskiauthor/ 

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8071273.Joanna_Kafarowski

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Joanna-Kafarowski/e/B072KLNH8N

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/kafarowski/

LinkedIn: https://ca.linkedin.com/in/joanna-kafarowski-342758141

ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Joanna_Kafarowski